The cold, dark winter is here, and it’s the perfect time to wear and make warm knitted items. The Knit and Stitch Creative collection has so far brought you patterns for lovely fingerless mitts, arm warmers, scarves and cowls, but today we’re looking at the wonderful world of knitted hats.  Whether you choose to make a bobble hat (Issue 1), an animal hat (Issue 3) a beanie hat (Issue 7), or a pull-on hat (issue 12), this is a fashion choice that’ll warm you right up!

Knitting beginnings

Beanies – also known as a “knit caps”, “watch caps”, or “tuques” are a great first knitting project, and one of the easiest hats you can make. They can be knitted flat or on the round, and using various yarn thicknesses. They have a lot of stretch, so knitting too tightly or loosely isn’t so much of a problem. Beanies are brimless and head-hugging, so always stay on your head. This is probably why beanie-type hats called “monmouth caps” were so popular with sailors and pirates in the 1500s and 1600s. They could keep their heads warm in the rough and cold sea air, and the caps wouldn’t fly off the hat and into the sea!

Bobble Hat, Knit and Stitch Creative Collection, Issue 1Easy knits

Adding a pompom on the top turns a simple beanie into a lovely bobble hat. If you’re a novice knitter, try our simple pompom hat in Issue 1. The pattern only involves garter stitch – using the knit stitch on every row – as well as some simple decreases. We think it’s a perfect first project for a newbie knitter.

Want to move onto the next step? Then look at the pull-on hat in Issue 12. This style of hat is similar to the Chullo, worn in South America to ward off the chill from the Andes mountains. Our pattern uses chunky yarn and 10mm needles, so will quickly grow. The ear flaps are knitted and sewn on separately, and we also show you how to customise the hat by adding plaits.

Lovely for little ones

Knitted hats are perfect for every age and are a great make for children. You can click here for a free and exclusive baby’s beanie hat pattern that we provided in Issue 4. We also provided this adorable child’s panda hat in Issue 3. It uses a few rows of ribbing on smaller needles, before switching to bigger needles and using stocking stitch (alternating knit and purl rows). Want to adapt it? You could switch to a teddy bear with a few colour adjustments, and omitting the panda’s black eyes.

Advanced for adults

If you’re looking for something more advanced, turn to Issue 7, a beanie hat using Mock English Rib. This a traditional, ridged stitch that creates a warm fabric. Beanies are great gifts for Christmas, as they’re unisex. This hat is especially good because it’s so stretchy – which will save you having to ask someone’s head size!

Feel inspired to make your own hat? Let us know in the comments, or tag us with your makes @CreaCrafts on Facebook, Instagram or Pinterest. We may feature you on future blog entries!

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